Advice Page 3

Customer Advice 3
Planting Your Frangipani Tree
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What preparations should I do before delivery?

What is the best way to move frangipani trees?

What advice do you have for planting frangipani trees?

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Responses

What preparations should I do before delivery?
The most important thing to do is to determine the best position to plant your frangipani trees into the ground. You need to choose the warmest and driest position available and also need to consider the result of growing 3 or 4m in the next 10 years.
You can also prepare the hole. 45 litre bags are around 30cms deep x 30cms across. 75 litre bags are about 40cms across. 100 litre bags are about 40 x 40cms. If you’d like to give your frangipani a better start, you dig the hole deeper and put some premium potting mix at the bottom of the hole before planting your frangipani.
You should also find a position to store the frangipanis temporarily until they go into their hole or new pot.
If your ordered frangipanis are large, you should organize a second person and prepare a trolley to help you move them around.

What is the best way to move frangipani trees?
A refrigerator trolley is good for moving large and heavy frangipanis. A second person and a wheel barrow is useful for moving small 45 litre frangipanis long distances. If you need to transport frangipanis in ute or trailer, the wind will damage the leaves and may damage the branches.
If the branches are upright, you might be able to lay it down with the trunk resting on something. You should also put something either side of the bag to stop the bag from rolling sideways.

What advice do you have for planting frangipani trees?
If your frangipani is in a pot, you should lean the frangipani on a 45 degree angle and press in the side of the pot near the bottom edge. Do this as you rotate the pot in a full circle twice.
Pull the main trunk. If the soil is dry and light, the root ball will probably stay in tact. Gently lower the frangipani into the hole and position it into the desired angle and direction.
If some of the soil falls away from the root ball, don’t panic. Make sure you put enough soil into the hole first to maintain the desired height. Fill in with soil and do a big watering straight away.

If your frangipani is in a bag, you should balance the bag on the side of the hole so you can cut a straight line with a knife straight across the bottom of the bag. Alternatively, you can cut a circle out of the bottom of the bag.
Lower the bag into the hole so that you’re happy with the direction and height of the frangipani, then cut up the sides of the bags. With the plastic cut in two pieces, pull the plastic out and fill in with soil.
If the root ball feels solid, the root ball is dry and the frangipani is in one of heavy duty green bags, you might prefer to take the frangipani out like it was in a pot (see above).

Remember to give a your frangipani a good watering after putting it into the ground and anytime after disturbing the roots!