Frangipani Trivia

Frangipani Trivia

Is the frangipani native to Australia?

What’s the difference between a plumeria and a frangipani?

What are the different types of frangipani species?

How many types of frangipani flowers are there?

How is the frangipani image used to sell other products?

Are frangipanis poisonous?

Why is the anti-frangipani car sticker following so popular?

Responses
Is the frangipani native to Australia?
The frangipani origins from central America.
By some definitions, if a plant species has harmoniously coexisted with other plants for several generations, it can be considered a native in that area. In many parts of Australia, the frangipani has done this so it may be considered a native Australian plant to some extent.
The native frangipani is a plant which looks very different to the common frangipanis. We are still building our stock level of the native frangipani so we have not yet started selling it yet.

What’s the difference between a plumeria and a frangipani?
A frangipani plant and a plumeria plant is the same thing.
Plumeria is the official botanical name and is commonly used in some countries while frangipani is a colloquial name used in many other countries, including Australia.

What are the different types of frangipani species?
Plumeria alba, Plumeria bahamiensis, Plumeria bracteata, Plumeria caracasana, Plumeria cubensis, Plumeria jamaicensis, Plumeria montana
Plumeria obtusa, Plumeria pudica, Plumeria rubra (aka Plumeria acuminata and Plumeria acutifolia), Plumeria stenopetala, Plumeria stenophylla
Plumeria tuberculata.
Rubra is the most common species in Australia with obtusa, which is only found in the northern states, being the next most common.
We also have a relatively high number of pudica and stenophylla.

How many types of frangipani flowers are there?
I guess there are just as many frangipani flower colours as there are animal species in the world. Don’t be fooled into paying for a 20cm frangipani plant with a fancy name which costs more than our 1.5m frangipani trees. Most of them don’t have a flower which is any more beautiful or any more fragrant than our advanced trees. See our common whites, pinks, tricolours and Singapore Whites on our online shop.

How is the frangipani image used to sell other products?
Like roses and other flowers, the frangipani image is put on all kinds of items to improve their appearance and to help them sell.
Frangipani fans sometimes want more than just frangipani flowers in their garden so they buy household goods and fashion items with frangipani patterns so they can see frangipani flowers everywhere they look. If it makes you happy, then go crazy!

Are frangipanis poisonous?
It has been written that the white sap inside frangipanis can cause the throat to swell and block the air passage. I have personally witnessed cows eating several frangipani branches and other animals having a frangipani nibble without any sign of illness. We often get frangipani sap on our skin and sometimes even sprayed in our eyes and we haven’t noticed any negative effects yet.
To be on the safe side, DON’T drink sap, don’t put it in your eyes and don’t let your pets nibble on your frangipani plants.

Why is the anti-frangipani car sticker following so popular?
On our previous website, we included a paragraph or two about frangipani car stickers and anti-frangipani car stickers.
We received one email which is worth sharing and as he points out, “the fad has been replaced but it was and is an interesting cultural phenomenon”.
 
Hi,
I’ve grown up with frangipani trees in Australia and I’ve always been a fan.

I just read the part about the anti frangipani car stickers. I don’t think anyone is against frangipanis. I think people get annoyed when they see personal expression which they perceive to be a following of a mass cultural trend. Even though many people would have covered their back windscreens in frangipani stickers because they just saw them and liked them, the perception of other motorists when they see so many people doing it is that it’s a childish fad used in lieu of ‘genuine’ personal expression. The same thing is happening with the ‘my family’ stickers – last week I saw someone with a sticker attacking these stickers. Interesting cultural phenomenon.
Most of us like to feel we are individual, and many (possibly the insecure as you suggest) have a bit of a ‘tall-poppy syndrome’ reaction to things perceived as ‘counterfeit individuality’.

Regards,
Micah